Wednesday, July 5, 2017

BBC Classics and Writer's Wisteria Tags




Hello all, 

Since I'm all for knocking tags out in one shot, I'll put up the two tags that caught me in this post. 

The first is the BBC Classics Tag. Apparently, the story goes that BBC put out this list of 100 classics and said that people only have read a percentage of them. Mary Katherine @ Sarcastic Scribblings gave me a challenge to see how many I've read. I (fool-hardily) said that I probably had read more than she did, seeing as how I recognized a lot of the titles. Well, we'll see.....

BBC CLASSICS TAG


RULES:
1. Be honest
2. Put an asterisk (*) next to the ones you've read and a addition sign (+) next to the ones you've started.
3. Tag as many people as the books you've read (yeah right, that's not happening!) 

THE BOOKS
  1. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen *
  2. Gormenghast Trilogy by Mervyn Peake
  3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte *
  4. Temple of the Golden Pavilion by Yukio Mishima
  5. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee *
  6. The Story of the Eye- George Batallie
  7. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  8. Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell
  9. Adrift on the Nile by Naguib Mahfouz
  10. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens 
  11. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott*
  12. Tess of the D'Uvervilles by Thomas Hardy
  13. Catch 22 by Joseph Heller 
  14. Rhinoceros by Eugene Ionesco
  15. Baron in the Trees by Italo Calvino 
  16. The Master of Go by Yasunare Kawabata
  17. Woman in the Dunes by Abe Kobo
  18. Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
  19. The Feast of the Goat by Marin Vargas Llosa
  20. Middlemarch by George Elliot 
  21. Gogol's Wife Tomasso Landolfi
  22. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  23. Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
  24. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  25. Fredydurke by Gombrowicz 
  26. Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse
  27. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  28. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  29. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll 
  30. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame 
  31. Anna Kerenina by Leo Tolstoy + (audiobook)
  32. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair 
  33. Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn- Mark Twain ++
  34. Emma by Jane Austen  *
  35.  Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe *  
  36. Delta Wedding by Eudora Welty
  37. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  38. Naomi by Junichiro Tanizaki
  39. Cosmicomic by Italo Calvino 
  40. The Joke by Milan Kundera 
  41. Animal Farm by George Orwell 
  42. Labyrinths by Gorge Luis Borges 
  43. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez 
  44. A Prayer for Own Meaney by John Irving
  45. Under My Skin by Dories Lessing
  46. Anne of Green Gables- L.M. Montgomery *
  47. Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
  48. Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes +
  49. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  50. Absalom Absalom by William Failkner
  51. Beloved by Toni Morrison 
  52. The Flounder by Gunther Grass
  53. The Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
  54. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen *
  55. My name is Red by Orhan Pamuk
  56. A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen
  57. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens *
  58. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  59. The Idiot by Fodor Dostoevesky 
  60. Love In The Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez 
  61. Of Men and Mice by John Steinbeck 
  62. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
  63. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman *
  64. Death on the Installment Plan by Celine
  65. Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
  66. On The Road - Jack Kerouac
  67. Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
  68. Pedro Paramo - Juan Rulfo
  69.  Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
  70. Moby Dick - Herman Melville *
  71. Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens 
  72.  Dracula - Bram Stoker
  73. The Metamorphosis - Kafka
  74. Epitaph of a Small Winner - Machado De Assis
  75. Ulysses - James Joyce
  76. The Inferno - Dante +
  77. Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
  78. Germinal - Emile Zola
  79. The Light House - Virginia Woolf
  80. Disgrace - John Maxwell Coetzee
  81. A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens *
  82. Zorba the Greek - Nikos Kazantzakis
  83. The Color Purple - Alice Walker
  84. The Box Man - Abe Kobo
  85. Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
  86.  A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
  87. The Stranger - Camus
  88. Acquainted with the Night - Heinrich Boll
  89.  Don't Call It Night - Amos Oz
  90. The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
  91. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
  92. The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery 
  93. Gravity's Rainbow - Thomas Pychon
  94. Memoirs of Hadrian, Marguerite Yourcenar
  95. A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
  96. Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe
  97.  The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas + (never finishing it. I hated this book)
  98. Hamlet - William Shakespeare 
  99. Faust - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  100. Metamorphosis- Ovid

Books I've Read and Started : 18. 


Ok, Mary Katherine, we tied.....




The second tag is the Writer's Wisteria tag. I snitched it off of Jane Maree's blog Maiden of the Misty Mountains. You can check out her post here.


Writer's Wisteria Tag

1) What inspired the idea for your current WIP (work in progress), and how long have you had the idea?

Which "current" WIP? 

I assume you mean my Camp NaNo one? 

Well....Rooglewood had a *small* influence in it. 

I've had the idea for about a month and a half now...ever since I heard about Rooglewood's Five Poisoned Apple's contest. 


2) What are you most looking forward to about this WIP?

Working with my amazing cabin mates *wink wink*


3) Have you ever dreamed about your characters?

How do you think they exist? 

😄

4) How do you go about naming your characters?

I love names with meaning. Most of my characters and places, especially in my fantasy works, have names that reflect one or more characteristic of that character. 

There are a couple ways that I go and find names for characters, places and even object names. 

One is an Internet site called behindthename.com. Whenever I'm looking for names from a specific country or region, this is the first site that I go to. They also have a search option for meanings. 

The second option is scouring through various baby name lists, including my board on Pinterest to find names. I've even found one for Elvish translations of normal baby names. My MC's name, Eirwen, actually came from a list of baby names related to winter. 

5) Do you plan out your theme?

I'm playing with a theme of avoiding bad company and have a few other ideas jumbling around my head. We'll see how it goes. 

6) Do you discover the MBTI thing of your characters? (if so, what are the types of your WIP protagonists?)

I used to be really into MBTI and using it to create characters. In the end, I started to feel really confined by it, as I was more concentrated on making my character fit the mold of the MBTI code. 

Instead, I just base characters off of people that I know or have observed. I'm a big people watcher and I love to figure out how people react. 

7) Have you a favourite genre to write in? (or do you like switching it up randomly)

I love writing contemporary, historical fiction and fantasy. Fantasy is starting to become more of my favorite, with historical fiction becoming a close second. 

8) What is a big inspiration for you in writing? (a person, book, quote, scenery, etc.)

Almost anything and everything can inspire me to write. Something absolutely totally random, such as observing a mirror on the first floor while being on a second floor balcony, can result in a story vignette that will later be put into a spy story one day. 

9) Are you competitive in your word counts, or more chill and relaxed?

I don't concentrate on the word counts. I want my story to make sense and to be complete. No matter how many words it takes. The only reason I had 10,000 word goal on Camp NaNo is because that is about the length of my one and only "finished" novella. 

10) Do you like sharing small snippets of your work? (*hint hint* :P)

When I have them to share :) 

As a matter of fact, I do have a very tiny one....

Now, I'm not going to follow the rules (somebody's got to be a rebel around here). Both of these tags are free for the taking, so go, have fun with them. 

Now to get to writing....

Scribbingly yours, 

Catherine

10 comments:

  1. How cool that this tag got around to you! I did it too, but I think you had more.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I may just have to do the second one. If I did the first one, it would be embarrassing. I haven't read enough classics. But the second tag sounds fun. Nice post, by the way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's ok, I think I embarrassed myself on the first one too. If it had been posed to my family, it might have gone a little better.

      Thanks, Ivie!

      Delete
  3. Ooh I loved that snippet. XD XD
    SO EXCITED THAT YOU DID THE TAG!! I loved reading all your answers also. :D

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is great! I love hearing about your writerly-ness (is that even a word? Let's pretend it is!) and characters. And that whole mirror thing sounds really cool! :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is now!

      That plot bunny found me really randomly, but it was so cool that I wrote it down on the spot. Now to find a story to stick it in...

      Delete
  5. I love this tag and I love the snippet and I love being in the same cabin! XD Great post Catherine, it was fun to read about the way you write. That's always of huge interest to me :)

    Anna - www.worldthroughherheart.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. *hugs* Yay! I was hoping you'd like my snippet. I love being in the same cabin too, it's so much fun in there!

      I have yet to find another person that writes the same way that I do. Not sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing yet. You'll have to check out the Early Writing Tag once I get it up.

      Delete

How are you, dear friend? Come closer to the fire, and make yourself comfortable! I'd love to hear what you've been thinking about! I only ask that proper decorum be observed.

I always try to reply to my correspondence! Have a blessed day!
~ Catherine